Game of Thrones Exhibition will feature Zoe Bradley Red Rose Corset

ZOE BRADLEY & GAME OF THRONES

Fans of the HBO series Game of Thrones will have a chance to visit an art gallery next week filled with a huge range of artwork inspired by the award winning programme. We are delighted that celebrated paper artist Zoe Bradley has been asked to take part in this exciting Pop Up exhibition in East London. Celebrating the release of Season 6 available now on Digital download and releasing on Blue-Ray & DVD on 14th November, Game of Thrones, fans will get the opportunity to see original pieces of work and inspirational pieces from the characters to never seen before storyboards, along with an exclusive look at costume sketches and other behind the scenes material.

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 A number of ambitious and innovative creations inspired by the characters and themes of the TV show will be on display in the Game of Thrones Art Gallery at 135 Bethnal Green Road in London’s Shoreditch from Thursday 10th – Sunday 13th November.
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Costume Designers from GoT from Season 1 – 5 from L: Michele Clapton & Michele Carragher. Photo: Perry Ogden
The exhibition will also feature never before seen sketches from the shows creators, including original storyboards from the series story boarder William Simpson and costume sketches and jewellery by Michelle Clapton, including the MEY for Game of Thrones.
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Installations and artwork will feature a variety of materials including wood, paper, embroidery, chain mail and mosaic tiles to large-scale prints from illustrators, painters and graphic designers.
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The Red Rose Corset made entirely from paper
Zoe Bradley has chosen to exhibit her Red Rose corset, first commissioned by Sotheby’s London earlier this year, as an inspired piece of costume from Game of Thrones Season 4 and in particular the Purple Wedding. The blood red rose corset (part of a much bigger dress) is a tribute to Natalie Dormer’s character Margaery Tyrell, in which the rose is used to represent the House of Tyrell.
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The detailed hand rolled Rose train of Margaery Tyrell Wedding Dress
The Red rose paper corset, adorned with red Swarovski crystals is an exaggerated silhouette to create more drama and theatre than Margaery’s actual wedding dress. However the detail of the hand rolled Briar Roses that crept around her dress in the Lion and the Rose episode in Season 4 is full of dark symbolism.
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The Red Rose & ruffle dress as it first appeared on show at Sotheby’s
Zoe Bradley’s creation echoes this symbolism with the red blood paper roses, marking the imminent bloody death of Margaery’s husband King Joffrey.
The variety of work on display from talented UK artist will ensure this is a must visit exhibition by any Game of Thrones fan or general art enthusiast.
Fan Art competition that ran on the HBO UK website invited fans of the show to awaken their artistic flair and ten talented winners were chosen by Issac Hempstead-Wright (Bran Stark in the show) and these will be displayed alongside the working artist creations.
Winter is Coming: Bran Stark played by actor Issac Hempstead Wright elected some art pieces that will be on show at the Pop Up exhibition
Event Details:
FREE ENTRY
Thursday 10th – Friday 11th November (Noon-9pm)
Saturday 12th – Sunday 13th November (10am – 6pm)
135 Bethnal Green Road London E2 7DG

Zoe Bradley creates Red Rose Dress for Chatswood Chase Sydney

ZOE BRADLEY CREATES RED ROSE DRESS FOR CHATSWOOD CHASE SYDNEY

‘Fashion can create a dream, create fantasy. Its a kind of theatre’. says American Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour and we couldn’t agree more with her. British paper artist and former fashion designer Zoe Bradley has created a large scale piece of theatre with her most recent commission the Red Rose Dress. Asked by prestige shopping centre, Chatswood Chase in Sydney to create a special piece of paper art that reflected the new season of Spring fashion collections, Zoe and her team got to work on designing and making the bespoke paper gown back in August.

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It’s not the first time of course that Bradley has created something so spectacular and theatrical. Previous couture style creations have been installed both in Sotheby’s London and Chelsea Design Centre, London. What always surprises the people that come to view these applied art pieces is the fact they are made entirely from paper. A material Bradley has built her name and brand on over the last decade, since leaving the house of the late great designer, Alexander McQueen, where creating wearable art with unconventional materials was seen as ground breaking.

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The dress was designed in the UK and the metal framework that supports the 3 metre high and 4 metre long dress was manufactured in Sydney under Zoe Bradley’s design and specifications. ‘My aim was to create a modern topiary like floral gown created entirely from red roses’ comments Bradley.

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Decorated with 392 individual rose’s and with over 12,000 petals individually hand curled, it took Zoe and her team over 100 hours of work both in the UK and Sydney to produce the breathtaking gown.

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John Klein, Marketing Manager for Chatswood Chase, comments ‘Our customers are absolutely loving it’. The Red Rose dress will be on display until the 30th November.

To see more magical work in paper by Zoe Bradley visit www.zoebradley.com

Sotheby’s Royal & Noble Descent auction exceeds in sale with Zoe Bradley collab

ZOE BRADLEY & SOTHEBYS COLLABORATION 
Paper Artist Zoe Bradley describes in her own words how her collaboration with auction house Sotheby’s produced some of her most memorable and challenging works to date. The recent success of this collaboration in London has meant that the Zoe Bradley pieces are likely to be shown in more of Sotheby’s markets, including Paris, Milan, New York and Hong Kong throughout 2016
‘Sotheby’s contacted my studio as they were looking for a collaboration with an artist that could use the stark simplicity of paper to compliment the artistry of the Old Masters period. They wanted to bring awareness to their forthcoming Of Royal & Noble Descent exhibition and auction alongside a contemporary artist.
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I met with Sotheby’s Old Master paintings specialist and magazine columnist Jonquil O’Reilly. A resident fashion historian and style ambassador. She inspired me with stories behind the paintings of the Old Masters and the traditions behind the garments and reasons for the styles of the fashion pieces. This proved a springboard for my own research. I began looking into paintings and costume books of etchings that documented the fashions of the time. I found the opulent wigs adorned with feathers, flowers, birds, and powdered with wheat flour stories fascinating. Visually these looked like works of art themselves! The enormous dresses with metres upon metres of the finest silks were tremendous fashion statements. Covered in ruffles, bows, fine lace work and jewels. We worked on scoring techniques with the papers to recreate the fine silks that were used in the court dress to emulate the luxurious nature of the fabric. A challenging but an exciting brief.
THE RED DRESS: EAST GALLERY
This monumental dress is 6m in length and 2.5m in height. It consist’s of over 6000 hand sculpted paper ruffles and was adorned with magenta Swarovski crystals along with individual hand crafted roses and ribbons. The symbolism of using red and the shear scale of the piece was created for its symbolism, relating to vast wealth in the 17th and 18th Century. Inspired by the Elizabethan period and the Spanish court dresses, the designs began with the Farthindales (the distinctive shape that goes underneath the dress) and commonly associated with the Tudor’s and worked up to the plunging neckline of a corseted bodice complete with large puff sleeves. The paper ruffle textile was created by hand folding each ruffle and fixing into place to create a delicate shell like textile, that reflected the ornate dress style of the period. The metallic finished paper was chosen for it’s luminous silky quality.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: Monumental red paper dress sculpture by British Artist Zoe Bradley is unveiled along side Royal and Aristocratic Heirlooms. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby's)

 SHOE: EAST GALLERY
These gold shoe’s were based upon a Venetian shoe, from 1700. Often heels would be worn by men as well as women. A fine and expensive shoe always had red heels and soles – the dye was expensive and carried a martial overtone. This fashion soon spread overseas – Charles II of England Coronation portrait of 1661 features him wearing a pair of enormous red, French style heels – although he was over 6ft (1.85m) to begin with. It was also indicative of how the wearer of a red sole or heeled shoes was part of the elite inner court circle.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: A gallery technician adjusts paper sculpture shoes adorned with Swarovski crystals. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby's)

 

The texture of the chinese silk was recreated through scoring by hand a scratched line across the metallic card to emulate this fine surface texture. The carnation and blossom flowers and 3D scroll effect were brought to life through pressing textures into the paper to bring these details to life. Every part of the shoe was recreated in acute detail, plaited edging and rolled strips make up the carved paper heals. The paper shoes were finished with a row of clear cut crystals that were placed around a paper buckle. A truly detailed work of art, if only they could be worn!

 

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   CROWN: NORTH GALLERY

This majestic sculpture was based upon Elizabeth I crown from the Tudor era. The crown is clad with over 3000 hand cut gold leaves and scored by hand 36,000 times. We finished this very fine detailed crown off by adorning it with Swarovski crystals and pearls. The detail in this piece really has to be seen to be believed.

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 NECK RUFF: NEW GALLERY


With a diameter of 100cm, which allegedly was the largest size neck ruffs were ever made to, this was technically the most challenging piece .
The 1580s saw the increasing use of lace in ruffs, it was a symbolic fashion accessory that showed wealth & status. The bigger and more frivolous these lacy wheels were the more ostentatious and vain the wearer appeared. We created a repeat laser-cut artwork inspired by Elizabeth I neck ruff, the finely cut details referred back to intricate lace designs of the Elizabethan era. We tried to emulate this detail through the laser cut design. The Ruff is created from over 30 metres of paper. The edges were finely cut to create opulence and delicate edging. Edges were historically kept crisp with straightening irons and we used the same method to give the paper a crisp finish.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: A gallery technician adjusts a paper sculpture or a ruff made from 48 meters of white paper, cut with an intricate lace pattern. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

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WIG: WILSON GALLERY

The 18th Century was the era of big hair for both men and women alike. Women’s hair was piled up into towering mounds, helped by padding and hair pieces and added chignons and this was to be my approach in creating the paper wig. Building the strands of paper hair onto an exaggerated mould, I was then able to build up the wig using all the decorations synonymous with this period, from ornament feathered birds, clusters of roses and bows with jewelled centres. Flower chains held in place by Swarovski coloured pearls were placed either side while a plume of feathers jutted from the back of the wig into the air. The fine ringlets at the back of the wig were twisted and rolled around modern day curling tongs, but that’s about where any similarity with today’s hair preparation ended!

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Paper Artist Zoe Bradley Talks On How Fashion & Art Inspire Her Work

ZOE BRADLEY TALKS ON HOW FASHION & ART INSPIRE HER WORK AT ROYAL ACADEMY OF ART

‘Craftmanship combined with silhouette is the handwriting of Zoe Bradley.’

“My precious experience working with Alexander McQueen at such a seminal moment in his career, ignited in me a real love of craftsmanship and detail’ says paper artist Zoe Bradley.

This really is where her career path took a left field turn. Instead of pursuing the normal route of ready to wear design, Bradley found a love and passion for creating extreme silhouettes in unusual materials. Working at McQueen’s studio led Bradley into sourcing materials, such as wood, metal and raffia. Today, Bradley choice of material is paper. She has developed her techniques over the past 10 years in what she describes as “A truly unique hand sculpted product that celebrates the beautiful and natural forms found in nature.”

34d6a6490f181db8ba207405725cfa14_largeThe winged plywood corset designed by Alexander McQueen and created by Bradley for his no 13 show 1999

Ahead of this Friday’s Talk at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Zoe Bradley will be discussing her journey from it’s humble beginning to where she is today. Fashion Editor and muse, Isabella Blow, championed Bradley’s early work. Blow loved her final graduate collection. She made her stamp of approval by photographing it for the cover of the Sunday Times Style magazine.

ZB_Final_collection_largeZoe Bradley’s final Graduate Collection as featured in The Sunday Times Style by Isabella Blow

‘I was drawn to the spectacle of the fashion show that bordered on performance art’ says Bradley. She cites Hussein Chalayan, Comme des Garcon, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen as inspirational designers. Mavericks in their design field, who were the exception. Not content with just showing their collections up and down a runway, they pushed boundaries and created theatre. Bradley knew she HAD to work with McQueen, whose vision she admired, respected and above all felt emotionally inspired by.

After joining the team as an intern in 1997, Bradley was given the role of showpiece maker working exclusively on the more unusual commissioned pieces that were very often not from fabric. Working closely from his sketches and specialist craft makers she assisted in creating some of the most iconic pieces in fashion, most recently seen in the exhibition Savage Beauty at New York’s Metropolitan Museum and more recently at the sell out show in London’s V&A museum.

As Bradley will explain in this Friday’s talk at the Royal Academy of Arts, these were defining moments in creating the spectacle and drama out of an everyday material. Paper.

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The pleated paper dress designed and created by Zoe Bradley for Michiko Koschino show 2005. Photo courtesy of Ram Shergill
From pleated showpieces for Michiko Koschino to creating a magical christmas  window for London store Liberty, Bradley’s path was set to become a paper visionary designer offering a bit of magic into the world of retail.
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Other commissions followed from Tiffany & Co, where Bradley designed and created 146 bespoke windows for their global christmas campaign. Inspired by Fairytales, the work resulted in a perfectly executed story book in a glass box.

Window4_largeOne of the five Fairytale scenes, designed and created in paper by Zoe Bradley for Tiffany & Co Global window campaign for Christmas 2009

From International windows that span from New York to Berlin, London to Hong Kong, Bradley has worked on creating some magical sets for advertising campaigns and produced detailed paper works of art for some of the best and well known magazines in publishing. Her work has been exhibited in Amsterdam and London’s Sotheby’s and appeared in numerous books on paper art.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: A gallery technician adjusts paper sculpture shoes adorned with Swarovski crystals. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby's)

If you’d like to hear Zoe Bradley talk more in detail about her life in paper and how fashion and art have really had a lasting influence on her work, please secure your place for this Friday’s insightful ‘In Conversation with …’event at Royal Academy of Art. Places are limited and the event would normally be open only to Friends of the Academy, who this week have been celebrating with all kinds of inspiring events from Talks to Workshops. The Zoe Bradley Talk takes place this Friday 20th May from 7pm – 8.30pm.

You can confirm your attendance by sending an email to the link below stating its for the Zoe Bradley Talk this Friday.

friends.events@royalacademy.org.uk

Places are STRICTLY limited.

There is also this link to our Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/events/176437826085716/

Zoe Bradley’s James Bond Spectre Day of The Dead Dress

ZOE BRADLEY’S JAMES BOND SPECTRE DAY OF THE DEAD DRESS WITH OMEGA WATCHES

As opening film sequences go, the new James Bond film, Spectre is pretty spectacular.

Celebrating the annual festival of Day of the Dead, a cast of thousands pulsate through the sultry heat of the Mexico City streets. They are dressed in the most elaborate and detailed costumes ever undertaken in any James Bond film.

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We were delighted therefore to get a call from leading luxury watch brand, Omega, whose timepieces have been worn by James Bond for the last 20 years, to ask if we could recreate one of the spectacular dresses that feature in the opening sequence.

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Zoe Bradley and her team set to work on sketches, designing elaborate and voluminous dress shapes and headpieces, incorporating large flowers and skulls. All of which were to be realised in paper!

The dress was commissioned by the top department store in Berlin Kaufhaus des Westerns (KaDeWe), whose entire windows have been dedicated to the new James Bond film.

The Day of the Dead dress was created from our studio using hundreds of hand crafted white paper flowers and 15 skulls were painstakingly put together using white paper. These were then applied by hand to the dress frame, creating a huge sweep across the window and framing a film still from the opening Mexico sequence.

Actress Naomie Harris, who plays Miss Moneypenny opened the Omega James Bond exhibition at the luxury department last week ahead of the Berlin Premiere of the film. The exhibition is open to the public until the 14th November 2015.