Zoe Bradley & Galleria Melissa – Neon Garden at Covent Garden

ZOE BRADLEY & GALERIA MELISSA – NEON GARDEN

When Bradley was asked to collaborate with Galeria Melissa in Covent Garden she saw the potential to bring the new element of film to her work. Melissa’s DNA is encoded with an obsession with the new and revolutionary; challenging and reinventing itself in each collection, thus echoed in Bradley’s own thoughts.

7-zoebradley-paperart-neongarden-melissa-paperflowers-neon-bright-designPhotography by Melvyn Vincent

As the gallery stands central in the centre of Covent garden’s iconic old flower market it. The shoe store with adjacent gallery means that Art is for all and the visitors that come to the store can have a window into the art world.

Bradley’s idea behind the installation was to create an exotic garden, celebrating the feminine, architectural forms of flowers. It was important that the scale of the garden was oversized so the petals towered above the viewer.

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The hot neon colour underpins the floral textile with accent colours such as fuchsia pink, pastel lilacs and deep plum which all open and bloom into a kaleidoscopic explosion of colour.

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The Lotus flower is the ‘hero’ flower of the piece and was used to give the floral textile and accompanying animated film the narrative behind the installation. This Lotus flower has come to be associated with purity and beauty in the religions of Buddhism and Hinduism.

A Quote Bradley found says:
‘I thought it was very interesting how the open flower and the unopened Lotus bud forms are associated with human traits. The unopened bud is representative of a folded soul that has the ability to unfold and open itself up.’

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When you visit the Gallery you are greeted from the doorway with a neon suspended Lotus flower in the entrance with a backdrop of a kaleidoscopic floral animation.

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Our collaborators Swhype worked tirelessly on the animation of this 3minute loop sequence to Bradley’s creative direction. Working directly with the patterns and filmed 3D hand-sculpted creation of each ZB paper flower. This backdrop of blossoming flowers added a magical element to the exhibition.

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As you continue down the stairs you enter a room vinyl wrapped in a hot neon oasis of flowers in a variety of oriental styles. A second lotus flower rotates on the floor echoing the motion of a flower opening upon a pond.

Bradley says:
“My work is drawn from nature and the natural rhythms in nature. There is always an element of symmetry in my work, from the floral elements to the overall silhouette of the piece. I look for balance and natural patterns. I work rather instinctively with the paper than mathematically; the flow of the piece is important to me so there is life and movement in the silhouette.”

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400 hand-sculpted flowers we’re created from Bradley’s studio and sculpted into a series of landscapes that we’re photographed by Arthur Woodcroft and stitched together to form a large scale wall vinyl. The artistry ran through this collaboration right down to the piecing together of the details of the vinyl.

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Bradley’s idea to turn the flowers into a vinyl wallpaper ment that the scale of the paper flowers could be used in a larger format that usual creating even more drama to the scale of her work.

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There are many layers to this exhibition, but the development of large wallpaper design is a new exciting avenue for Bradley one that you should see more developments over the coming year!

Zoe Bradley creates Red Rose Dress for Chatswood Chase Sydney

ZOE BRADLEY CREATES RED ROSE DRESS FOR CHATSWOOD CHASE SYDNEY

‘Fashion can create a dream, create fantasy. Its a kind of theatre’. says American Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour and we couldn’t agree more with her. British paper artist and former fashion designer Zoe Bradley has created a large scale piece of theatre with her most recent commission the Red Rose Dress. Asked by prestige shopping centre, Chatswood Chase in Sydney to create a special piece of paper art that reflected the new season of Spring fashion collections, Zoe and her team got to work on designing and making the bespoke paper gown back in August.

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It’s not the first time of course that Bradley has created something so spectacular and theatrical. Previous couture style creations have been installed both in Sotheby’s London and Chelsea Design Centre, London. What always surprises the people that come to view these applied art pieces is the fact they are made entirely from paper. A material Bradley has built her name and brand on over the last decade, since leaving the house of the late great designer, Alexander McQueen, where creating wearable art with unconventional materials was seen as ground breaking.

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The dress was designed in the UK and the metal framework that supports the 3 metre high and 4 metre long dress was manufactured in Sydney under Zoe Bradley’s design and specifications. ‘My aim was to create a modern topiary like floral gown created entirely from red roses’ comments Bradley.

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Decorated with 392 individual rose’s and with over 12,000 petals individually hand curled, it took Zoe and her team over 100 hours of work both in the UK and Sydney to produce the breathtaking gown.

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John Klein, Marketing Manager for Chatswood Chase, comments ‘Our customers are absolutely loving it’. The Red Rose dress will be on display until the 30th November.

To see more magical work in paper by Zoe Bradley visit www.zoebradley.com

Celebrating Olympic success with Team GB at British House Rio

ZOE BRADLEY & RIO OLYMPICS CHANDELIER

Entrance_British_House_Chandelier_d1b48eee-a86f-42f3-8deb-972e1fef6b5c_largeThe entrance to British House with Zoe Bradley’s paper chandelier greeted Team GB & guest’s.  

After Team GB’s most successful Olympic Games to date, we reflect on the last incredible 16 days in Rio and like a ripple effect, the feel good factor its left in its wake, that will inspire a whole new generation of sporting talent.  Team GB won medals in 19 events, more than they achieved in London four years ago. Since last weekend British athletes have appeared unstoppable in their quest to attain or in many cases retain Olympic medals. It has been an incredible sporting event to witness and we have been honoured to have had a piece of Zoe Bradley paper art hanging within the beautifully transformed space of British House.
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A view from underneath the Zoe Bradley chandelier at British House
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Olympic Canoe Slalom Gold medallist Joe Clarke.
The old colonial style architecture of the building set within Rio’s Botanical Gardens in Parque Lage could not have been better placed. In the shadow of the iconic  and monumental Christ the Redeemer it has been Team GB’s hospitality residence during the Games. We couldn’t have possible predicted before these Games in Rio that so many British athletes would be collecting such an impressive medal haul and having their photo taken in front of our paper floral chandelier.
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Olympic Gold medallist’s Katie Archibald & Elinor Barker for Team Pursuit Cycling
It was the very impressive and decorative doomed entrance that the hundreds of paper floral garlands hung from a circular structure. Made up of three rings, that decreased in size, rather than the more symbolic interlocking five rings, the colourful iridescent paper was illuminated both day and night, welcoming Team GB athletes their families and guest’s into a home from home environment where they could relax and share their success and most importantly switch off from the pressures of competing within the Olympic Park or other competing venues.
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Olympic Medallist’s David Florence & Richard Hounslow won Silver in the Men’s double Canoe Slalom
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A delighted Bryony Page jumps for joy after winning a Silver medal in Trampolining
Perhaps now the very late nights of the past fortnight have been put to rest and the many dark circles that hung less graciously than the Olympic flag from our eyes have started to lift, we can truly appreciate what coming second on the medal board, ahead of vast nations such as China and Russia means to our small but great nation.
We hoped by adding the colour gold into the paper floral garlands that it would offer some incentive and inspiration to our athletes. Little did we know when it was hung in place 2 weeks ago, just how symbolic the gold would become and how dominant the colour would be for our most inspiringTeam GB yet.
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Golden Olympians: Team GB success in the rowing both in the Men’s Fours and the women’s pairs. From Left to Right: Mohamed Sbihi, George Nash, Helen Glover, Heather Stanning, Alex Gregson, Constantine Louloudis
It seems the chandelier that everyone has had to pass under into British House reflected some of its glory and colour, namely gold onto Team GB, bringing them Olympic success.
Bring on the Great! Bring on Tokyo 2020!

Zoe Bradley Impresses Team GB British House at Rio Olympics with Huge Paper Chandelier

ZOE BRADLEY & TEAM GB BRITISH HOUSE 

We are only into Day 5 at the Rio Olympic Games in Brazil and @TeamGB have edged ahead of their Olympic medal haul from London 2012. The sunny feel good factor emanating from Brazil is a welcome tonic to our dull British summer back home. Naturally the team at Zoe Bradley have another reason to be cheerful along with Team GB bringing back the medal hardware from Brazil, as we celebrate with them over at British House Rio, where the athletes and invited guests can take some much need time out and enjoy the historic house’s temporary refit with comfortable furnishings from a host of British brands.

BHR_Luke_Garcia_day1_HR_-78_largeView from below the Zoe Bradley floral paper chandelier at the entrance to British House. Team GB’s hospitality venue for Rio 2016.
Photo Credit: Nina Pennick

In case you have missed it (our advice is to simply look up) on entering up from the steps to the impressive entrance, you are faced with a huge circular chandelier. Its bright, its cheerful and will hopefully only add to the warm celebratory glow of those fortunate enough to visit Team GB’s British House.
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Close up detail of the hundreds of hand curled paper petals that make up the cascading paper chandelier in Team GB’s British House. Photo credit: Nina Pennick
We were delighted to take on this very special commission when Zoe Bradley was asked to design and create a chandelier that was ‘colourful, inspiring, something that evoked a celebration’.
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Zoe Bradley paper ring chandelier hanging in the entrance of British House, Parque Lage, Rio de Janerio Brazil.
We understand athletes and guest’s have been impressed by the scale of the hundreds of drops of brightly coloured flowers. The hand curled paper flower heads, based on the local Bougainvillea plant, was created and made from our studio in Wales UK and exported to Rio. Each day it gives us a smile and a sense of true patriotism as the coverage of @teamGB hard work and achievements get the rewards and recognition they all so deserve.
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The colourful chandelier made up of hundreds of hand curled paper flowers hangs in the entrance to British House, Rio Brazil. Photo Credit: Nina Pennick
Realising this large scale hanging piece, required long hours, attention to detail, execution of finish and an impressive presentation. These same qualities reflect the dedication from our own talented athletes, yet it would be churlish to compare an athletes years of hard work and determination with our own efforts of raising the chandelier in British House. We however, are incredibly proud and privileged to be a part of this global sporting event in Rio and wish every athlete that has to walk under our  chandelier that it gives each and every one an extra bit of luck and inspiration to go out and enjoy their Olympic experience.
https://www.britishhouserio.com/sponsor/zoe-bradley/

Sotheby’s Royal & Noble Descent auction exceeds in sale with Zoe Bradley collab

ZOE BRADLEY & SOTHEBYS COLLABORATION 
Paper Artist Zoe Bradley describes in her own words how her collaboration with auction house Sotheby’s produced some of her most memorable and challenging works to date. The recent success of this collaboration in London has meant that the Zoe Bradley pieces are likely to be shown in more of Sotheby’s markets, including Paris, Milan, New York and Hong Kong throughout 2016
‘Sotheby’s contacted my studio as they were looking for a collaboration with an artist that could use the stark simplicity of paper to compliment the artistry of the Old Masters period. They wanted to bring awareness to their forthcoming Of Royal & Noble Descent exhibition and auction alongside a contemporary artist.
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I met with Sotheby’s Old Master paintings specialist and magazine columnist Jonquil O’Reilly. A resident fashion historian and style ambassador. She inspired me with stories behind the paintings of the Old Masters and the traditions behind the garments and reasons for the styles of the fashion pieces. This proved a springboard for my own research. I began looking into paintings and costume books of etchings that documented the fashions of the time. I found the opulent wigs adorned with feathers, flowers, birds, and powdered with wheat flour stories fascinating. Visually these looked like works of art themselves! The enormous dresses with metres upon metres of the finest silks were tremendous fashion statements. Covered in ruffles, bows, fine lace work and jewels. We worked on scoring techniques with the papers to recreate the fine silks that were used in the court dress to emulate the luxurious nature of the fabric. A challenging but an exciting brief.
THE RED DRESS: EAST GALLERY
This monumental dress is 6m in length and 2.5m in height. It consist’s of over 6000 hand sculpted paper ruffles and was adorned with magenta Swarovski crystals along with individual hand crafted roses and ribbons. The symbolism of using red and the shear scale of the piece was created for its symbolism, relating to vast wealth in the 17th and 18th Century. Inspired by the Elizabethan period and the Spanish court dresses, the designs began with the Farthindales (the distinctive shape that goes underneath the dress) and commonly associated with the Tudor’s and worked up to the plunging neckline of a corseted bodice complete with large puff sleeves. The paper ruffle textile was created by hand folding each ruffle and fixing into place to create a delicate shell like textile, that reflected the ornate dress style of the period. The metallic finished paper was chosen for it’s luminous silky quality.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: Monumental red paper dress sculpture by British Artist Zoe Bradley is unveiled along side Royal and Aristocratic Heirlooms. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby's)

 SHOE: EAST GALLERY
These gold shoe’s were based upon a Venetian shoe, from 1700. Often heels would be worn by men as well as women. A fine and expensive shoe always had red heels and soles – the dye was expensive and carried a martial overtone. This fashion soon spread overseas – Charles II of England Coronation portrait of 1661 features him wearing a pair of enormous red, French style heels – although he was over 6ft (1.85m) to begin with. It was also indicative of how the wearer of a red sole or heeled shoes was part of the elite inner court circle.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: A gallery technician adjusts paper sculpture shoes adorned with Swarovski crystals. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby's)

 

The texture of the chinese silk was recreated through scoring by hand a scratched line across the metallic card to emulate this fine surface texture. The carnation and blossom flowers and 3D scroll effect were brought to life through pressing textures into the paper to bring these details to life. Every part of the shoe was recreated in acute detail, plaited edging and rolled strips make up the carved paper heals. The paper shoes were finished with a row of clear cut crystals that were placed around a paper buckle. A truly detailed work of art, if only they could be worn!

 

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   CROWN: NORTH GALLERY

This majestic sculpture was based upon Elizabeth I crown from the Tudor era. The crown is clad with over 3000 hand cut gold leaves and scored by hand 36,000 times. We finished this very fine detailed crown off by adorning it with Swarovski crystals and pearls. The detail in this piece really has to be seen to be believed.

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 NECK RUFF: NEW GALLERY


With a diameter of 100cm, which allegedly was the largest size neck ruffs were ever made to, this was technically the most challenging piece .
The 1580s saw the increasing use of lace in ruffs, it was a symbolic fashion accessory that showed wealth & status. The bigger and more frivolous these lacy wheels were the more ostentatious and vain the wearer appeared. We created a repeat laser-cut artwork inspired by Elizabeth I neck ruff, the finely cut details referred back to intricate lace designs of the Elizabethan era. We tried to emulate this detail through the laser cut design. The Ruff is created from over 30 metres of paper. The edges were finely cut to create opulence and delicate edging. Edges were historically kept crisp with straightening irons and we used the same method to give the paper a crisp finish.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 14: A gallery technician adjusts a paper sculpture or a ruff made from 48 meters of white paper, cut with an intricate lace pattern. At Sotheby's on January 14, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by John Phillips/Getty Images for Sotheby’s)

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WIG: WILSON GALLERY

The 18th Century was the era of big hair for both men and women alike. Women’s hair was piled up into towering mounds, helped by padding and hair pieces and added chignons and this was to be my approach in creating the paper wig. Building the strands of paper hair onto an exaggerated mould, I was then able to build up the wig using all the decorations synonymous with this period, from ornament feathered birds, clusters of roses and bows with jewelled centres. Flower chains held in place by Swarovski coloured pearls were placed either side while a plume of feathers jutted from the back of the wig into the air. The fine ringlets at the back of the wig were twisted and rolled around modern day curling tongs, but that’s about where any similarity with today’s hair preparation ended!

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